Author Archives: GRACE S. UDDIN

12 years ago

Remembering Celso Pojas

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Slain peasant leader Celso Pojas is revered by poor folk.

On that early morning of May 15 this year, Celso Pojas, 45, was sipping a cup of coffee inside the Kilusang Magbubukid sa Pilipinas (KMP) office in Bugac, Maa when he got up, told a colleague he had to buy few cigarette sticks and went outside.

Nobody had an inkling it was to be their last time to talk to him.

As the secretary- general of Farmers’s Association of Davao City (FADC), Pojas was preparing to go to Compostela town as part of the support groups to attend to hundreds of Lumads, who were fleeing their homes in Monkayo and Compostela because of military operations there.

12 years ago

Roadblocks fail to stop protesting Davao workers

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On their way to Davao city, workers from the provinces of Compostela Valley and Davao del Norte braved road inspections, ‘surprise checkpoints’ before they were able to join the Labor Day rally to express their demands for the P125 across-the-board wage increase, for government to bring down prices of basic commodities, including rice.

12 years ago

Military operations displace Ata Manobo families

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TUCKED-IN. Using a piece of cloth slung to their bodies, lumad women swaddle their young ones, tucking them close to their bodies as they walk. Ata-Manobo women and children are among those displaced by the relentless military operations in Talaingod. Many of the residents were accused of being guerrillas. (davaotoday.com photo by Jonald Mahinay)

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13 years ago

Poor and landless after 19 years of CARP

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By GRACE S. UDDIN | Davao Today

Jolito Divinagracia and Ranel Enoc are among the farmers in Tamugan, Calinan district, whose parents are beneficiaries of the government’s Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP). But almost 20 years into the program, both their families are still having a hard time acquiring the land supposedly awarded to them.

13 years ago

Comelec praises soldiers, blames voters for missing names

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On the allegation that soldiers campaigned against partylist groups, Comelec official said it was within a soldier’s right to do so. On the missing names in precincts, he had this to say: “What happens is that when people do not see their names right away, they immediately complain.” He said voters were not diligent enough to look for their names.