Author Archives: ANDREA MALAYA M. RAGRAGIO

6 years ago

Acting Up (UP)

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Acting Up (UP)

There’s been a little hullabaloo in my favorite unibersidad lately. A few weeks ago, Department of Budget and Management Secretary Butch Abad, exiting from a forum at the UP School of Economics, was met with a vigorous protest by activist students and teachers. Their call was to make Abad, and all those associated with the unconstitutional Disbursement Acceleration Program, accountable.

6 years ago

Vaginas and Violence

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Vaginas and Violence

But let’s do Eve Ensler one better. I’d like to think that my anger should be reserved for more serious things, especially if I’m going to rant about it in front of all of you. My vagina is angry, and if I tell you the four reasons why, maybe you’ll find that all your vaginas are angry, too.

6 years ago

Homecoming [Part 2]

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Homecoming [Part 2]

Encountered mess and damage we did. We had barely caught our breaths after the hike from Nasilaban to the neighboring village of Sambulungan when some of the Talaingod Manobos started approaching us. Their houses had been ransacked, items were missing, one kitchen’s GI roofing had been ripped off.

7 years ago

Why We Should Defend Pantaron

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Why We Should Defend Pantaron

Around a week ago, when the reports of the Talaingod Manobo exodus first began trickling in, I happened to glance at a copy of a Mindanao regional daily at a local cafe. The front page proudly bannered that two battalions had been brought in from Luzon to add to counter-insurgency operations here in the Davao region. In my gut, I knew that this happy headline had something to do with the misery of my friends and many others in Talaingod.

7 years ago

The Bakwit of the Talaingod Manobos

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The Bakwit of the Talaingod Manobos

As schools across the country are holding commencement exercises, schoolchildren from Barangay Palma Gil in Talaingod, Davao del Norte would be trudging, instead of marching, and going not up a stage to be applauded, but down from their mountain communities. In the process they have earned a new title – not graduates, but bakwit, evacuees, the displaced.